K-Grade 3 Resources » Remembrance Day

Remembrance Day

Veterans Affairs Canada - Indigenous Veterans

"National Aboriginal Day is celebrated each year on June 21, while Aboriginal Veterans Day is commemorated on November 8. Indigenous people in Canada have reason to be proud of their wartime contributions. More than 7,000 First Nations members served in the First and Second World Wars and the Korean War, and an unknown number of Inuit, Métis and other Indigenous people also participated. One Veterans group estimates that 12,000 Indigenous men and women served in the three wars."

 On CBC Unreserved...

"This week we're looking at the ways Indigenous soldiers contributed to war efforts across the globe. With stories of those who fought, the secrets they kept and what happened after they came home."

National Aboriginal Veterans Day Continues to Grow in Size and Scope 

 click here to read article and find out why Aboriginal Veterans commemmorating on a different day than November 11. 

"National Aboriginal Veterans Day has been growing in size and scope since it was inaugurated by Winnipeg’s city council in 1994, with commemorations popping up in different parts of the country."

Or this article Remembrance Day and Aboriginal Veterans Day​, click here  

 'The first time I had freedom': Spotlighting Sask.'s Indigenous WW II veterans
 
​Click here to read article and hear voices of of these veterans and their experiences.

"When visiting her home province of Saskatchewan a few years ago, a photographer was inspired to learn more about a handful of remaining Indigenous Second World War veterans, in part because of the inequality they faced after their service."

Lesson Ideas and Resources:

Hallway Display

Nicole Perret (Indigenous Support Worker) and Nicole Seeley  (Indigenous Support Worker) and Lesley Johnson (Teacher Librarian) worked on a hallway display of indigenous veterans leading up to Remembrance Day with the following blurb:

Indigenous veterans faced a battle at home as well as overseas during the First and Second World Wars.  In many cases they were barred from actual fighting, and those who were successful in enlisting were given menial tasks, insufficient gear, and the most difficult duties.  They were also barred from benefits after returning from war - kept from joining the Legion, refused services from Veterans Affairs, and many other injustices.
 
They fought bravely and with pride.  Many of them became highly decorated soldiers on the front in spite of the numerous obstacles they faced.
 
We will remember them. 

Download this document for the pictures and display:

An intro powerpoint 

created by Lelaina Jules, SD71 Secondary District Indigenous Curriculum Support Teacher. Please feel to personalize and add information to fit your school community. 

Also,
Interesting fact
“Aboriginal participation in Canada’s war efforts was proportionately higher than that of any other group of
people in Canada. It is estimated that one in three able-bodied Aboriginal men enlisted in the First World
War. More than 7000 Status Indians fought in the two world wars; some estimate that the number would be
closer to 12,000 if the Non-Status Indians were included.” (Source: Veterans Affairs Canada website.)
 

Native Soldiers, Foreign Battlefields: Remembrance Series

"Generations of Canadians have served our country and the world during times of war,
military conflict and peace. Through their courage and sacrifice, these men and women
have helped to ensure that we live in freedom and peace, while also fostering freedom
and peace around the world. The Canada Remembers Program promotes a greater
understanding of these Canadians’ efforts and honours the sacrifices and achievements
of those who have served and those who supported our country on the home front."

​Check out the link below to see the whole booklet.